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Wild Food: Mugwort (Artemesia vulgaris)
Another plant from our city foraging walk with Chris Hope. Earlier in the season it would have had reddish or yellow flowers. This tall and sturdy plant is a common visitor to uncultivated ground, roadsides and hedgerows in Britain.
Tender mugwort leaves can be steamed and eaten as a green, although care should be taken as some people can have a mild allergic reaction. In old herbals, a tea made from the leaves was recommended as a tonic and to help against nervous anxiety.
The plant also has a strong connection with the feminine and is an emmenagogue, which helps encourage menstrual bleeding. A particularly magical plant, mugwort was another of the sacred herbs from the Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, where it was called the ‘oldest of plants’ (yldost wyrta).
When placed in the shoe, the herb was said to protect wayfarers on long journeys. Mugwort could also be hung in a house to avert  the evil eye. Dried, mugwort can be used in ‘smudging sticks’ as alternative to sage.
[source: Chris Hope, Ipso-phyto; Leechcraft, Stephen Pollington; A Modern Herbal, M Grieve]
**DO NOT eat wild plants, seeds and berries without thoroughly identifiying them first as many are deadly poisonous.**

Wild Food: Mugwort (Artemesia vulgaris)

Another plant from our city foraging walk with Chris Hope. Earlier in the season it would have had reddish or yellow flowers. This tall and sturdy plant is a common visitor to uncultivated ground, roadsides and hedgerows in Britain.

Tender mugwort leaves can be steamed and eaten as a green, although care should be taken as some people can have a mild allergic reaction. In old herbals, a tea made from the leaves was recommended as a tonic and to help against nervous anxiety.

The plant also has a strong connection with the feminine and is an emmenagogue, which helps encourage menstrual bleeding. A particularly magical plant, mugwort was another of the sacred herbs from the Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, where it was called the ‘oldest of plants’ (yldost wyrta).

When placed in the shoe, the herb was said to protect wayfarers on long journeys. Mugwort could also be hung in a house to avert  the evil eye. Dried, mugwort can be used in ‘smudging sticks’ as alternative to sage.

[source: Chris Hope, Ipso-phyto; Leechcraft, Stephen Pollington; A Modern Herbal, M Grieve]

**DO NOT eat wild plants, seeds and berries without thoroughly identifiying them first as many are deadly poisonous.**

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  1. that-christian-witch-though reblogged this from thegreenwoodtree
  2. dontmesswiththehoz reblogged this from drraemccoy and added:
    Good to know about putting mugwort in the shoes thing :)
  3. drraemccoy reblogged this from lokeanconcubine
  4. lokeanconcubine reblogged this from norvicensiandoran
  5. norvicensiandoran reblogged this from thedruidsteaparty
  6. herbalearthling reblogged this from thedruidsteaparty and added:
    Wild Food: Mugwort (Artemesia vulgaris) Another plant from our city foraging walk with Chris Hope. Earlier in the season...
  7. tea-and-nature reblogged this from thedruidsteaparty
  8. thedruidsteaparty reblogged this from thegreenwoodtree
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  13. jauntywistful reblogged this from maxsalad and added:
    Wild Food: Mugwort (Artemesia vulgaris) Another plant from our city foraging walk with Chris Hope. Earlier in the season...
  14. maxsalad reblogged this from thegreenwoodtree
  15. alaceamory reblogged this from sagefae
  16. thegreenwoodtree reblogged this from thecarvingwitch and added:
    That’s interesting to know!
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  18. ahorsewalksintoabar reblogged this from thedruidsteaparty
  19. thecarvingwitch reblogged this from the-darkest-of-lights and added:
    Gotta love Mugwort. As someone with anxiety, I can tell you it’s fantastic for calming, and also for encouraging sleep....
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